The Rise of Design: Design and Domestic Interior in Eighteenth-century England

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Paperback: 259 pages
Publisher: Pimlico; New Ed edition (2000)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0712664769
ISBN-13: 978-0712664769
Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches

“Eighteenth Century Decoration; Design and Domestic Interior in England” is a history of design and interiors. It concentrates on the appearance of rooms at all levels of society and charts the emergence of the professional designer and decorator. For this book, Charles Saumarez Smith has amassed over 400 contemporary illustrations, including architects’ drawings, pattern books, conversation pieces and satirical prints and, together with letters and literature of the day, he provides the most complete account of the 18th century interior to date. His expert knowledge reveals the changing role of the architect in the planning of interiors, explores the artistic conventions which determined how rooms were depicted and brings fascinating perceptions into the broader aspects of society. This illustrated source book should be invaluable to anyone interested in interior design and decoration

3 thoughts on “The Rise of Design: Design and Domestic Interior in Eighteenth-century England

  1. Johna66 says:

    Some genuinely great information, Glad I discovered this. Good teaching is onefourth preparation and threefourths theater. by Gail. edcaekgeefee

  2. Jean Falconer says:

    In the section 1760-1780 I am surprised to find that Mr. Saumarez Smith refers to the carpet maker from Axminster as Thomas Chitty when his name was Thomas Whitty. I am currently researching Whitty and I was shocked to find such a basic error by such an eminent art historian. If the book is re-published, I suggest that you ensure that the spelling is amended.

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