More Rome

We walked down the Viale dell’Uccellaria, past the eponymous aviary:-

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Down to the British School of Rome, founded in 1901 and now housed in a building constructed by Lutyens in 1911 for the International Exhibition of Art:-

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We called in at Canova’s studio:-

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And so back to the hotel:-

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Hoping that S. Ivo might be open in the afternoon:-

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Morning in Paris

I went for a short walk in the deuxième.

Through the Place Vendôme:-

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And the Passage Choiseul:-

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Down the Rue Vivienne past the Bibliothèque Nationale:-

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To the Galerie Vivienne:-

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And back through the Palais Royal:-

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Versailles

I came back from São Paulo to join my last Patrons’ tour (to Paris and Rome).

We started with Versailles:-

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Then, into the Queen’s Apartment, starting with the Salon d’Hercule, with ceiling paintings by François Le Moyne:-

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Through into the Salon de Vénus, with its statue of Louis XIV by Jean Warin:-

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And ceiling paintings by Le Brun:-

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Next door is the Salon de Diane, with the bust of Louis XIV by Bernini:-

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The Salon de Mercure with ceiling paintings by Jean-Baptiste de Champaigne:-

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The Salon d’Apollon with Apollo in his Chariot by Charles de la Fosse:-

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The Salon de la Guerre with Louis XIV by Coysevox:-

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Then into the private apartments of Louis XV with its wood carving designed by A-J Gabriel in the late 1730s:-

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Finally, we visited the ground-floor private apartments of Madame Victoire:-

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I was brought up not to like or admire the architecture of Versailles: too rich, too opulent, too Louis XIV. I wish I had paid its history more attention.

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The Glass House

I was waiting for permission to post pictures of the Glass House, where we spent the most utterly pleasurable and interesting morning meeting people who had known not only Lina Bo Bardi, but also, her husband Pietro Maria, who remained Director of MASP into his late seventies.

It was the greatest possible treat to have it to ourselves, secluded in the midst of a suburban forest:-

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It’s not just the house, but the garden as well – the sense of organic nature and Lina Bo Bardi’s love of the outside, the back-of-house, the pathways through the undergrowth – her experience of Brazilian vernacular as well as her importation of European modernism:-

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