St. Faith’s, Stepney

I have several times been intrigued and baffled by the survival of an apparently medieval arch built into the side of a 1920s housing block on the north side of Shandy Park, a nondescript park created in 1885 as a playground by the Metropolitan Public Gardens Association on the site of Captain Barber Beaumont’s old Burial Ground.   It is all that survives of St. Faith’s, a mission church opened in 1891 under the auspices of St. Dunstan’s.   The church was damaged by bombing in 1940 and demolished some time afterwards.   The arch is all that survives:-

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Collect (1)

We went on our annual visit to Collect at the Saatchi Gallery, starting with the display of work by Julian Stair in the Oxford Gallery (good for ashes):-

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And jointly with Simon ten Hompel (one part of a shelf installation):-

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Bettina Speckner at the Gallery SO:-

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And new work by Romilly on the stall of Goldsmiths’ Fair:-

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Waterloo Bridge

En route to the Bankside Gallery, I walked across Waterloo Bridge.   ‘Earth has not anything to show more fair’ (wrong bridge, I know).   But look how it has been transformed.   The Palace of Westminster dwarfed by the towers of Vauxhall:-

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The Festival Hall dwarfed by a forest of new tower blocks:-

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The Shard dwarfed by the new bulbous monster south of Blackfriars Bridge:-

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St. Paul’s – poor St. Paul’s – lost in a forest of tower blocks:-

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Whatever happened to town planning ?

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ThinkHand

I don’t normally use my blog for campaigning, not least because I’m not really involved in campaigning; but tonight I went to the launch of a campaign called ThinkHand which is trying to persuade the NHS to allow clinical trials and provide drugs to people with MS who are confined to a wheelchair. Apparently, once in a wheelchair they are classified as 6/5, which implies that they are beyond help in spite of the fact that they keep the use of hand and brain. The jazz was provided by someone with MS. The paintings were by a Czech mathematician with MS. And the jewellery was by Romilly:-

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Peter Lanyon

I called in today on Hazlitt Holland Hibbert to see their small, but choice Peter Lanyon exhibition, organised to coincide with the publication of Toby Treves’ catalogue raisonée.   I’m not that familiar with his work, apart from what was shown recently in the Courtauld Institute Gallery.

I preferred the early work when he was still in Cornwall, a bit drier and more experimental.

Godrevy Lighthouse (1949):-

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Farm Backs (1962):-

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Rockefeller Collection (2)

I nipped back to have another quick look at the Rockefeller Collection, including Picasso’s Fillette à la corbeille fleurie (1905), one of the star items in the sale:-

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And Picasso’s drawing of an apple, which is inscribed ‘Picasso Noêl pour Gertrude et Alice’, the nicest possible Christmas card:-

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