M. Jones a’i Fab

No visit to Anglesey is complete without a trip to see Merfyn and Trish Jones who run the nicest antique shop in the world on Beaumaris High Street.   He’s got another shop two doors down which is not open to the passing visitor, full of rural Welsh crafts, including the slate ornaments made when the slate workers were on strike:-

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Penmon Priory

We went on our annual visit to Penmon to see the lighthouse and eat a bacon bap at the Pilot Café.   We stopped at St. Seiriol to admire the Romanesque church first established by King Einion in the early sixth century and re-established as an Augustinian Priory in the 1220s.   It’s satisfyingly simple, on the edge of the Straits, with the Prior’s House still occupied, but not by a Prior, next door:-

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St. Peulan, Llanbeulan

The church at Llanbeulan is, like Tal-y-llyn, looked after by the the Friends of Friendless Churches.   Like Tal-y-llyn, it’s remote, reached by a track across fields, although the illusion of rurality is broken by the proximity of pylons:-

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St. Mary, Tal-y-llyn

I discovered the church of St. Mary, Tal-y-llin in the Shell Guide’s entry for Aberffraw.   It’s actually on a deserted road about three miles north- north-east of Aberffraw unmarked by the Ordnance Survey.   It’s a magical place, looked after by the Friends of Friendless Churches and miraculously open, not just to visitors, but to the fields.   Empty of any paraphernalia except a deep and rural piety:-

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Ruthin

Wonder of wonders.   A ring road takes traffic round Ruthin so one misses the town centre, one of the best preserved small market towns in the British Isles, with more surviving medieval town houses than I have seen close together anywhere and a still surviving medieval town plan, with views down the streets of the countryside.

This is the amazing Town Hall designed by Poundley and Walker (the Companion Guide says ‘who else ?’ as if one should easily recognise their work):-

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Ruthin Craft Centre

Ruthin Craft Centre is in a curious place:  not in the centre of the small market town, but in an industrial park on the outskirts.   No matter.   It shows crafts of the highest quality, better than Collect, with an exhibition of Welsh crafts which we missed at Collect and a very priginal, beautiful exhibition of jewellery in non-precious metals by makers from all over the world, mainly Scandinavia and Japan.

This is a view of the courtyard:-

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We particularly liked the work of Eunmi Chun, a Korean based in Munich, who makes work from intestines:-

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Oriel Mostyn

I would like to say that I enjoyed the Mostyn Art Gallery, but I didn’t.   I have always regarded it as small, but perfectly formed, one of the nicest of the small regional galleries, with beautiful top-lit galleries and an admirable programme of exhibitions.   Lottery funding has enlarged it and given it an odd, pseudo-Liebeskind entrance space, all diagonal lines and out of sympathy with the original, with a pyramid on the roof.   But at least I liked the fine terracotta façade and it’s sculptural detailing:-

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Bangor University

We had been tipped off that Bangor University has a botanical garden so went to enquire at the main university building.   I had never actually been up the road which leads to Henry Hare’s grand set piece of monastic monumentalism which overlooks the city.   In my five minute, self guided tour, all I was able to appreciate was the grandiosity of the detailing:-

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Bangor Pier

I may have done a post about Bangor Pier before because it’s a convenient place to hang about whilst waiting for a train.   It was opened in 1896 and stretches a long way across the Menai Straits with views to the east of onion domes and Great Ormes Head:-

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