Soundscapes

I was keen to see the National Gallery’s Soundscapes, which has been curated by Minna Moore Ede, who organised the exhibition Metamorphosis in which three contemporary artists responded to Titian.   This time she has got six contemporary composers and sound artists to respond the paintings in the National Gallery’s collection.   The point is to get visitors to slow down, to listen as well as to look, and respond to art through all their senses.   First is Gallen-Kallela’s Lake Keitele interpreted by Chris Watson, a sound engineer who recorded bird song not in Norway where there is too much sound pollution, but instead in Northumbria:-

image

image

Next is Holbein’s Ambassadors, which looks wonderful so artificially lit and as accompanied by Susan Philipsz on a violin without a string (I had never noticed that the lute in the painting has a broken string):-

image

image

image

Antonello’s Saint Jerome in his Study is interpreted elaborately (perhaps too literally) by Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller:-

image

There is a very beautiful and highly intelligent setting of the Wilton Diptych by Nico Muhly, done with feeling:-

image

image

image

Cézanne is accompanied by a short score by Gabriel Yared:-

image

image

The exhibition ends with Théo van Rysselbergh’s Coastal Scene set to music by Jamie xx, a remix artist.

The whole exhibition has for some reason got up the nose of critics who have had an overdose of dyspepsia in writing about it.   All it needs is time and attention and sympathy for its purpose, which is to stumulate more than one sense.

Standard

One thought on “Soundscapes

  1. pbmum says:

    Absolutely loved Susan Philipsz’ Artangel piece (2010) with haunting music at various City of London locations. And in this house Nico Muhly is regarded as a man who can do no wrong – particularly by our eldest teenager. Have witnessed his involvement in various projects at the Barbican and am always impressed by his tiggerish enthusiasm. Will certainly make time to get to Soundscapes.

    Joan

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s