Wells Cathedral

Our first view of Wells Cathedral was from the east, much larger than expected, like a monastic church in France:-

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We had a guided tour of the west front, originally grandly polychromatic and constructed between 1215 and 1248 under the supervision of Adam Lock and Thomas Norreys:-

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Inside is fine, squatter than many:-

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There is good carving:-

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We liked the amazing scissor beam arches designed in the mid-fourteenth century to support the tower:-

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We enjoyed the transi tomb of Thomas Bekynton, the Bishop of Bath and Wells in the mid- fifteenth century with his skeleton below and Chantry Chapel above and metal railings to keep the public out:-

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Graffiti on the tomb of Ralph of Shrewsbury:-

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The door through to the Choir:-

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The door into the Undercroft:-

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We ended by trying to recreate – without success – the famous Frederick Evans photograph of the Chapter House steps:-

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7 thoughts on “Wells Cathedral

  1. feildsara says:

    The chapter house steps used to flow like a waterfall: they had been worn away over the centuries by the feet of the devout. But then they were straightened – the victims of health and safety, I assume. A great shame from an aesthetic point of view.

  2. Yes, but it’s such a beautiful Cathedral that a slight imperfection like that cannot spoil the experience. Did you mange to get into the upper reaches ? It’s an excellent example of how wonderfully well our Cathedrals are being restored, with young stonemasons learning the old skills.

  3. Victoria says:

    Love Wells Cathedral. I think the inverted arches are referred to as scissor beam arches and are unique.

  4. Christopher Nevile says:

    From the Heights (In Cathedral League Terms only!) of Lincoln i had always thought Wells to be more Aston Villa than Leicester City, but your reportage makes me definitely want to visit. There looks to be, as you say a ‘monastic ‘ quality which is very appealing. Many thanks.

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