The New Tate Modern (2)

We went back to the new Tate Modern to get a better sense of it without the opening crowds.   It felt better being able to navigate it on one’s own.   We liked the view from outside the new south entrance:-

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Kader Attia’s table reconstructing the ancient city of Ghardaïa out of couscous:-

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Regent’s Park (3)

I have just been to a talk by the landscape historian, Todd Longstaffe-Gowan, about the layout of the gardens in Regent’s Park.   The argument was that Nash, who worked in partnership with the landscape designer, Humphrey Repton for eight years in the 1790s, was so immersed in the literature and ways of looking of the picturesque and the writings of Richard Payne Knight and Uvedale Price, that he always thought about buildings not just on their own, but how they would be viewed from a distance from within the park as part of a visual and scenographic composition.   Now, Todd is recommending that the Crown Estate Paving Commission, which has had responsibility for the gardens since it was first established in 1824, should go back as far as possible to the original scheme of planting:-

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St. George’s, Campden Hill

I went to a memorial service this afternoon for Lisa von Clemm, a grand stalwart of the bookbinding community who we first met in the summer of 1988 on an island off the coast of Maine (her husband, Michael, was responsible for Canary Wharf).    The service was held in St. George’s, Campden Hill, a bit of Victorian Torcello in Notting Hill, designed by Enoch Bassett Keeling, a so-called ‘rogue architect, in a style which was known as ‘eclectic gothic’, with good polychromatic brickwork on leafy Aubrey Walk:-

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Albert Memorial

I am a sucker for the Albert Memorial, particularly glimpsed in the distance, surrounded by trees and greenery and unkempt grass, gleaming with grandiose ostentation.   My mother would have dismissed it with contempt.   In fact, I can hear her whisper ‘absolutely hideous’ in my ear.   I don’t care.   There’s something magnificent about that moment of Victorian imperial confidence which allowed Prince Albert to be surrounded by statuary representative of the four corners of the globe:-

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Regent’s Park (2)

Before going round Regent’s Park, I was shown a very beautiful, fold-out panoramic view of it, produced by Richard Morris, the Secretary of the Medico-Botanical Society of London, and published by Rudolph Ackermann in 1831, price £1 10s., described on its title page as a Panoramic View Round Regent’s Park.   From drawings taken on the spot by Rich. morris, Author of Essays on Landscape Gardening and recently republished by the London Topographical Society.   These give much more of a sense of how it was originally intended to be:  more theatrical, less private, much less planting and a place of public parade.

This is Hanover Terrace to the west, completed in 1822:-

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Clarence Terrace:-

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Serpentine Pavilion

I didn’t necessarily expect to like the latest Serpentine Pavilion by Bjarke Ingels, but I did:  a piece of pure geometry, simultaneously simple and complex in a way that is visually both adventurous and satisfying:-

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Henry Cole Wing

One of the few benefits of a morning which was so cold and wet is that, when the air cleared, it had a crystal clarity.   So, I was not the only person who was impressed by the Henry Cole Wing, designed by Henry Scott as a School of Naval Architects, gleaming in the early evening sun, with its abundance of terracotta ornament, the loggia at the top which allowed the students access to fresh air, and its restrained Victorian pomp:-

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