The New Tate Modern (1)

It was the opening day of the new Switch House:  a radically different set of geometries to the original Giles Gilbert Scott Power Station.   The new building, joined at the hip by Herzog and de Meuron, is a neo-Egyptian brick ziggurat.   It’s impossible to get a full sense of what its impact will be in a single day and how the linear geometries of the old boilerhouse will relate to the triangular grid of the new ground plan.   It’s certainly extremely impressive on its own, with its complex changing outline, built on top of the original oil tanks and sharing much of the same industrial aesthetic, with sweeping circular concrete staircases leading upwards, Jasper Morrison furniture, a lot of public spaces and wonderful views from the top of all of London.

This is the building from outside:-

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The basement:-

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The view from the roof:-

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The shard:-

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And the turbine hall from the new crossing point between the two buildings:-

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One thought on “The New Tate Modern (1)

  1. Maurice Davies says:

    Right now it’s wondefully full of groups of schoolchildren, being encourgaed to do performative activities as if it’s the 1960s again. And overall the sense of social performance and people watching is lovely. A bit like the early years of the Pompidou Centre. Sadly circulation is now even more confusing from level 1 where many people enter.

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