Howard Hodgkin

I missed the opening of Howard Hodgkin’s exhibition Absent Friends and have only just caught up with it, remembering poignantly that the exhibition coincided with his death.   I was particularly interested to see his portrait of the dealer, Peter Cochrane, which was accepted by the NPG in lieu in 2010.   It’s definitely a portrait and a fine one.   Elsewhere, one of the captions says that Hodgkin didn’t like talking about art and he certainly may always have been reticent, but it’s worth remembering that he became a Trustee of the Tate Gallery in 1970 which will have required him to talk about art.   I prefer, as everyone does, his pictures post-1975 when his style suddenly loosens and becomes more freely imaginative, described by Hodgkin himself as ‘more about myself now, or incidents which personally involved me, at least’.   He carried on painting right until his end.

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7 thoughts on “Howard Hodgkin

  1. John holden says:

    Hello Charles. I hope you will be able to visit the forthcoming Hodgkin show, Painting India, that opens at The Hepworth Wakefield on July 1st.

  2. Joan says:

    We were able to get up close to the Hodgkin In The Studio of Jamini Roy on a tour of the Government Art Collection a couple of weeks ago. A proper treat.

  3. Edward Chaney says:

    Curious to read in the catalogue to this show (p. 149) that Hodgkin was taught at Camberwell by Euston Road Schooler Graham Bell in 1949-50, given that Bell was, alas, killed in an air crash in 1943…

      • Edward Chaney says:

        Yes Bell’s fellow Euston Roader, nice Claude Rogers, went on to teach me (but not much) as the Professor of Fine Art at Reading University… I’m correcting proofs of epic articolo for Journal of Wyndham Lewis Studies on all this (and on why most contemporary art is so crap).. Hopefully out in time for Lewis’s big retrospective at IWM Manchester later this month…

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